Red-handed Howler Monkey (Alouatta belzebul)
Red-handed Howler Monkey, near Itaituba, Pará, Brazil, September 2000

Brazil

The small group of Howler Monkeys in photo 1 came down from this tree shortly after this shot as a very heavy thunderstorm came over.

The reason why we know, despite the poor light, that they are Red-handed Howler monkeys as opposed to any other type of Howler is that all eight species are geographically separated one from the other so, if we are south of the Amazon and east of the Purús River, they must be the Red-handed, Alouatta belzebul, species.

Red-handed Howler Monkey, Caxiunã, Pará, Brazil, November 2005 - click for larger image Fortunately, the monkeys at Caxiuanã in the other photos came close to the tower giving excellent views.

Howler monkeys produce bouts of loud roaring at dawn. This is to mark the home range of each troop and to warn off any invaders from another troop.

Red-handed Howler Monkey, Caxiunã,;, Pará, Brazil, November 2005 - click for larger image

Although Howlers are the largest New World primates, they have remarkably small home ranges. This stems from the fact that they eat many more leaves than other primates who are more dependant on ripe fruit and therefore need a larger area in which to forage.

There is an illustration in Eisenberg & Redford, Plate 10.

Red-handed Howler Monkey, Caxiunã, Pará, Brazil, November 2005 - click for larger image
Red-handed Howler Monkey, Caxiunã, Pará, Brazil, November 2005 - click for larger image
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