Fernandina's Flicker (Colaptes fernandinae)
Female Fernandina's Flicker, Soplillar, Zapata Swamp, Cuba, February 2005 - click on image for a larger view Soplillar, Zapata Swamp, Cuba
February 2005

Fernandina's Flicker is a rare Cuban endemic which is classified by Birdlife International as Endangered.

It is found in open woodland, grassland and marshes all with palms close by. The palms are required for nesting holes and the destruction of palms by parrot trappers (Cuban Parrot Amazona leucocephala also nest in these palms) as well as nest site competition from other species of woodpecker and general loss of habitat, have led to the serious decline of this attractive bird.

It is yellowish-brown with black bars and a cinnamon head with thin black streaks on the crown.

Male Fernandina's Flicker, Soplillar, Zapata Swamp, Cuba, February 2005 - click on image for a larger view The male, seen here in the second photo, has a black malar stripe while the female's malar stripe is heavily mottled as can be seen in the first photo.

They feed on ants and insect larvae and often forage on the ground.

There is an excellent page on this species at Birdlife International.

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